June Career Training Events: Production Compensation Panels
Career Training

Join us for a series of Production Compensation Panels exploring music royalties, grand rights, small rights, and more!

 

Thursday, June 16


Production Compensation Part Three: Music Compensation

Atlantic Time: 4pm
Eastern Time: 3pm
Central Time: 2pm
Mountain Time (D): 1pm
Mountain Time (S): 12pm
Pacific Time: 12pm
Alaska Time: 11am
Hawaii Time: 9am

Learn about the process of licensing your song or musical from multiple industry perspectives!

When do you get paid for writing a musical? What happens if somebody wants to license a song from your show? How can you be sure that you're being compensated according to industry standards?

Join Sean Flahaven (Chief Theatricals Executive at Concord Theatricals), Kirsten Childs (composer/lyricist/librettist of Bella: An American Tall Tale and The Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin), and Jeanine Tesori (composer of Kimberly Akimbo, Caroline or Change, and Fun Home), for a conversation on music compensation moderated by DG Executive Director of Business Affairs Ralph Sevush. 

The panelists will share their experiences and expertise as they help you discover what terms like "grand rights" and "small rights" mean, the difference in royalties for a play vs. a musical, and whether the addition of other musical collaborators (such as orchestrators and arrangers) impacts how you're likely to be compensated for your work.

The more you know about the industry standards from both the creative and business perspectives, the more informed and empowered you'll be when it's time to get to work on your next musical project!

Panelists:  Kirsten Childs, Sean Flahaven, and Jeanine Tesori

 

Thursday, June 23


Production Compensation Part Four: Alternative Forms of Compensation

Atlantic Time: 4pm
Eastern Time: 3pm
Central Time: 2pm
Mountain Time (D): 1pm
Mountain Time (S): 12pm
Pacific Time: 12pm
Alaska Time: 11am
Hawaii Time: 9am


What alternative forms of financial compensation enable dramatists like you to keep writing when you're in between production opportunities?  Many dramatists manage to make a living in the arts by being multi-hyphenates. Instead of putting their eggs all in one basket and waiting for that ever-elusive big production of their play or musical, writers are finding ways to earn money from a variety of different industry outlets.

Join us on June 23 to learn how to maximize your earning potential as a playwright, composer, lyricist, or librettist and how to resourcefully supplement your income through unconventional career paths. You'll hear from panelists (soon to be announced) who will discuss their personal experiences and offer advice on what you need to know about earning an income through publishing royalties, awards, residencies, and working as a teaching artist. Discover how to create financial stability for yourself in a traditionally unstable field.

These panels are part of a series, presented by the Dramatists Guild's Best Practices Committee, that investigates how dramatists are compensated for their work.

 


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