About the Guild

Our Mission & History

The Guild has over 7,000 members nationwide, from beginning writers to the most prominent authors represented on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theaters.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work.

The Guild believes that a vibrant, vital and provocative theatre is an essential element of the ongoing cultural debate which informs the citizens of a free society; and that if such a theatre is to survive, the unique, idiosyncratic voices of both men and women who write for it must be cultivated and protected.

To that end, the Guild maintains model contracts for all levels of productions, (including Broadway, regional, and smaller theaters) and encourages its members to use these contracts when negotiating with producers. These contracts embody the Guild’s overarching objectives of protecting the dramatist’s control over the content of their work, and ensuring that the dramatist is compensated for each use of their work in a way which will encourage them to continue writing for the living stage.

The Dramatists Guild of America was established for the purpose of aiding dramatists in protecting both the artistic and economic integrity of their work.

In addition to its contract services, the Guild acts as an aggressive public advocate for dramatists’ interests and assists dramatists in developing both their artistic and business skills through its publications, which are distributed nationally, and the educational programs which it sponsors around the country.

 

The current president of the Guild is Doug Wright (I Am My Own Wife, Grey Gardens).

Past presidents have included Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Sherwood, Robert Anderson, Frank Gilroy, Peter Stone, John Weidman and Stephen Schwartz. Past Guild members have included Eugene O’Neill, George S. Kaufman, Mary Rodgers, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, Frank Loesser, Lorraine Hansberry, Frederick Loewe, Alice Childress, Edward Albee, and Tennessee Williams.